Family Leaves after a New Born

According to a new report, the number of the new mothers that are opting for the maternity leave remain stagnant even though there has been economic growth. This has gone against the expert’s expectations since the ease on the family finances would enable more mothers to take time off from their jobs after they have given birth to a child. Though more than half of the maternity leave that is taken by the American mothers are not paid the figure has is slow to change. On the other hand, the number of leaves taken by men has increased at a high rate during this time, shows the report by the Center for Human Resource of the Ohio State University.

 

 

According to the report, there is no fluctuation of the number of the mothers taking leaves whether paid or unpaid. For instance, there has been an average of 273,000 women who took maternity leave between 1994 and 2015. This translate to constant maternity leaves per 10,000 birth remained constant. These figures defy logic because the country experienced 66% growth in the economy in the same period. According to Jay Zagorsky a contributor to the report he said that he expected the number of women taking maternity leaves to increase considering the growth of the economy.

 

 

Three states that include New Jersey, Rhode Island as well as California have also passed legislation on maternity leaves. For example, the New Jersey’s family policy that was passed in 2009, enables mothers to take leave for six weeks at reduced pay, that has an annual cap, for the care of the infant or the ailing member of the family. The number of people taking leaves is about 3000 each year, this is according to the report that was released last year.

 

 

The state of New Jersey was the second state after California to enact family leave after a new born. According to officials, this was one of the most vital steps toward investing in the future of the young children as well as their families. After passing of the reforms most parents and other stake holders believed that New Jersey needed to make some minimalist law reforms so that to make the law work efficiently for that parent who is in the low-income bracket.