Are Children Often Forced to Give Up Childhood in Service to Sports?

The New York Times recently investigated whether or not children often were forced to participate in sports for a large portion of their developing years. In an opinion editorial, David McGlynn, the author of a fatherhood memoir, recounted his feelings about his son’s experience with sports and how one decision made all the difference in his son’s life.

 

McGlynn recounts his own childhood as a part of the sports community. The current professor at a Wisconsin university spent most of his developmental years preparing to be a competitive swimmer. He swam for his high school team as well as a more competitive team during his high school years. He earned a scholarship to college where he remembers being beaten on a regular basis by swimmers who would go on to win Olympic medals. McGlynn recalls his frequent practices, long hours spent traveling for competitions, and sore muscles from all the physical work he put in. He also recalls greatly enjoying every minute of his time spent swimming competitively. Because he enjoyed his experience so much, it was difficult for him to admit to himself that his son, a budding basketball player, seemed to be miserable.

 

After having several discussions with parents who had raised children who participated in competitive sports, McGlynn gave his son the option of quitting the basketball team. He suggested that they spend their weekends and free time participating in activities that they actually enjoyed like kayaking or skiing. After some consideration, McGlynn’s son did quit basketball in favor of more enjoyable activities and his dad noticed that the decision was the right one. No longer was McGlynn’s son angrily contemplating mistakes he made in games or practices, but he was now enjoying life and building character in non-competitive activities. McGlynn went on to publish a memoir encouraging Americans to investigate the true nature of their children’s involvement with sports and if that involvement is adding value or hindrance to the family’s life.

 

Parenting After Divorce: The Bird Nesting Method

In a recently published New York Times article, writer Beth Behrendt discussed the benefits of a relatively new parenting option for divorced families called the bird nesting method. Behrendt and her ex husband have successfully used the nesting method for the past three years to coparent their three children. In the nesting method, the divorced parents each purchase or rent a separate living space from the family’s previously established home. They then choose alternate days or weeks to come and live in the family home with the children while the alternate spouse returns to the separately assigned living space. In this arrangement, children are thought to feel less jostled and displaced by a divorce because they remain in their home with their own belongings.

Behrendt described the living situation as one that appealed to both she and her ex-husband because they desired to place the needs of their boys before their own needs. During a recent speaking event in New Jersey where Behrendt gave a talk about the nesting method, she described her reaction when she first read about the arrangement in a book about simplified divorces. Behrendt stated that she breathed a sigh of relief at the idea that her boys could maintain as much of their original lives as possible throughout the divorce.

Behrends stated that she is frequently asked about her peculiar nesting arrangement by other well meaning parents in PTA groups or school conferences. She advised for parents considering the method to answer a few questions regarding the method. The parents should ask if they can work together to maintain their previously established home, if they can both reasonably find a home to live in during the times when they are not occupying the home, and if they can come to an agreement about the circumstance. If the answer to any of these questions is no, the nesting method may not be suitable. Those open to the nesting method, however, may find it a reasonable solution to their divorce.

New York Times Investigates Results of Saying “No” to Children

In a recent opinion editorial published by the New York Times, a New Jersey author, Scott Sonenshein, discussed some positive effectives of saying, “no,” to a child. Despite the frequent attempts to vilify negative affirmations from parents to children, several new studies show what common sense already tells most parents. To build character in children, they must be refused on a regular and consistent basis.

Soneshein points out in his article that most parents, throughout the history of the world, have understood children as a group of individuals who are growing and learning. Because of the immature nature of a child, it is important to correct behavior on a consistent basis if the child is to develop into a responsible, productive member of society. Saying no to a child does not have to be a negative experience. By teaching children that all humans are eventually given negative answers in life, parents enforce the idea that challenges can be overcome and that negative answers can actually be positive and beneficial. If a toddler asks for cake for every meal of the day, for instance, the parents answer should explain why this is a poor choice that will ultimately lead to illness in the child. In this case, a negative answer is the loving answer and a positive one would be considered neglectful.

Soneshein also sites a study where children are asked to construct a new object from the ones they are given. In this study, younger children were shown to be more resilient than older ones and more adaptable to negative answers. Soneshein relayed the message that parents should not always be in the habit of purchasing every item children ask for. Not only does this create spoiled and entitled children, but it limits a child’s ability to become resourceful when they lack something they believe they need. We have all heard the stories about how our grandparents didn’t have fancy toys so they got creative with dirt and a box. Much like this example, children learn extremely resourcefulness when they are given negative answers.

Mindfulness in Parents May Cause a More Peaceful Birth Experience, According to New Jersey Physician

New research from New Jersey’s Center for Pregnancy Research has recently revealed that mindfulness among parents may lead to a peaceful and less painful birthing experience. The study was recently mentioned in an article from the New York Times and consisted of a trial of 30 pregnant mothers were monitored before, during, and after their deliveries in an effort to control the anxiety that they felt. The results of the study make researchers hopeful that non-chemical methods of pain relief during childbirth can be on the horizon for expectant moms.

At the beginning of the trial, new parents were asked about their fears regarding childbirth. Most of the new mothers, not surprisingly, stated that they feared the pain of childbirth in a very real way, having not ever experienced it before. Researchers then attempted to educate the expectant mothers in mindfulness to prepare them for childbirth. In the mindfulness education classes, certified midwives would attempt to teach mothers to remain alert and focused on the present moment during labor. Midwives stated, during the course, that the key to mindfulness was that new mothers must learn not to focus on events before or after the most current contraction. They were taught that they could overcome their fears about the labor by implementing a moment by moment thought process.

Following their education in the ways of labor and delivery mindfulness, the confidence levels of the new parents were measured according to a survey. By the end of the research experience, mothers were much more confident in their ability to have a peaceful and controlled labor and delivery. According to one midwife, mindfulness creates opportunities for the expectant mothers to discover new levels of inner strength and resources. The mindfulness studies were shown to significantly impact the pain of childbirth for the mothers who attended the classes. More than half of the mothers believe they had a controlled and peaceful birth because of the preparation they received prior to delivery.

It’s Time for Central New Jersey Parents to Disconnect From Technology

It seems that adults are always complaining that young people are way to involved in their mobile devices, but it is time for us to take a look in the mirror. With a recent survey conducted with parents throughout Central New Jersey uncovering that up to seven non-work hours a day are spent in front of a computer screen, many are crying out that enough is enough. It seems that the days of families spending quality time with once another are slowly passing us by.

It is no secret that children need their parents. Not only are adults to be a proper role model, they are to help young people develop into the type of productive members of society that we desperately need. It is little wonder that children and teenagers today are spending so much time in front of their own tablets and smart phones. If that is the only activity that they see their parents doing on a regular basis, then that is what they will do as well. Parenting is a full time job. Many in Central New Jersey are concerned that we have lost site of this reality.

Alternatives do Exist

There are some habits that you can begin to enforce that will help in this area. Begin enforcing no technology zones or times within your daily schedule. This can include daily meals together, game nights, and any other structured activity where the entire family is gathered around. Simply insist that phones and tablets are not welcome, and that goes for adults as well. If you think that you need your mobile device in the event of an emergency, just remember that there was a day not long very ago when such technology was not invented yet. People got by just fine, and so will you.

When parents begin to show their kids that time is valuable, families are strengthened. It is this type of bond that people in Central New Jersey are hoping to return to once again. Begin by doing your part today and setting a positive example.

New Jersey Parents In Need of Single Parenting Advice

A drastic increase in the amount of single-parent families in New Jersey has created a new demand for single-parent resources and literature. The New York times recently reported that the number of single parent homes has doubled in the last decade and that New Jersey now holds a single parent population that is expected to surpass the number two-parent house holds within the next twenty years. With this change in the way that families operating, the New Jersey Parent Alliance released an informative packet that serves to help single parent families to balance family time with work obligations.

Time Management
Time management skills are necessary in every family, but is obligatory for single parent households. The balancing of time between work, family time, extra curricular activities, and other pastimes that the family engages in can be extraordinarily difficult for single parents. The New Jersey Parenting Association recommends that single parents work to eliminate all activities that are not essential. Multiple children, for instance, do not need to become involved in several extra curricular activities. For the single parent, it is important to set realistic expectations for every planned activity.

Dealing With Financial Constraints
Financial constraints are one of the most severe issues plaguing single parent households. Single parents must learn to make one income work for an entire family. Budgeting classes that teach individuals how to create budgets and create financial constraints to help reduce the burden on these families. Financial assistance programs may also be available to single parents who fall below average income levels for New Jersey.

Avoiding Poverty
Single parent families represent an estimated 80 percent of the impoverished community in New Jersey and in the rest of the nation. Fatherlessness causes poverty in almost every family environment. To combat the possibility of poverty, single parent families should seek to obtain educational credentials that enhance their desirability in the job market. Higher education has never been more attainable than it currently is and single parents benefit greatly from higher degrees.

Real Estate in New Jersey

There are a lot of places around the country where the real estate market is appreciating rapidly. New Jersey is leading the pack in this area. Over the years, the number of people who have moved to New Jersey has increased dramatically. This is an area that a lot of people are excited about. Now is the time to try and figure out a plan for the future for people who are investing in real estate in the area.

 

 

Financing

 

Many people who invest in real estate have to finance the property they are buying. Financing is getting easier than in previous years, and some people are concerned that this could cause a bubble to form in the market. However, many seasoned investors believe that the market still has many years to continue to grow before that happens. This is always something that investors need to consider before buying a property that is leveraged.

 

 

Real Estate Investing

 

One of the most important things that anyone can do for their finances is to invest for the future. Investing in real estate has a lot of advantages to other forms of investing. Not only can you earn monthly cash flow by renting out properties, but you can also grow your net worth by experiencing equity appreciation over time. New Jersey investors have experienced a lot of equity growth through real estate price appreciation. Investors are making money, and they are out looking for new properties to buy. This is only going to continue to drive up prices in many areas.

 

 

Future Changes

 

Many real estate experts believe that New Jersey is going to continue to see an increase in real estate prices in the future. With all of the changes that are going on in the economy, more people than ever are looking to buy their first home. This is causing a huge shortage in the supply of homes, and this shortage is only going to continue to increase prices in the future.

 

Kids Are At Risk Online So Parenting Tools Must Include Internet Security Skills

Parents in Central New Jersey, as well as parents all over the country, are discovering that the most dangerous threat to children’s security is the Internet. Children live in an online world parents don’t understand. Every day kids could experience online threats, and most parents don’t realize it. Parents are quick to act, when it comes to fastening seat belts, making sure children wear a bicycle helmet. But when it comes to minimizing children’s exposure to social media sites and other online sites, parents drop the ball, big time.

 

 

The Internet is a wonderful tool for research projects, school reports, and communicating with teachers and other kids, but the freedom to access the Internet poses a safety hazard. An online search for a basic word like Legos may be mistyped, and a website about legs pops up instead. That site might contain other parts of the body that are x-rated. Parents must talk to their kids about Internet use. And parents should be aware of what the kids see and hear when they are online. That means extra work for some parents, but most parents accept the responsibility.

 

 

There is a federal law called the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), and that law stops anyone from getting a child’s information without a parent’s approval. The COPPA law helps protect kids under the age of 13. But even though the law helps, the best way to protect children is to be a parent and lovingly monitor online use.

 

 

Being a 21st-century parent is a huge responsibility. Children today experience a plethora of situations, that could jeopardize their safety. Even though kids are more aware, and they try to do the right thing, children will be children. They are naturally inquisitive, and they are unaware of the sophisticated tricks that are part of the Internet world.

 

 

Parents must protect kids from themselves. Being a parent is a job. A full-time job. Some parents like to use the helicopter approach to parenting, but that doesn’t usually end well for the kids or the parents. The best way to keep children safe is to allocate a time to use the Internet. A time when a parent is available to help them understand what is good Internet interaction, and dangerous Internet interaction.

Parenting in Central New Jersey–Baby Sleeping Boxes

Parenting is the ultimate eventual long-term investment any parent can have in this world. While parenting may sound fun and exciting before an individual gives life to a baby, many challenges have been associated with raising infants. Given the current economic hardships across the world, parenting has taken a new toll with more advanced techniques being implemented to make it easier for the parents. According to scientific reports, most kids experience sleep-related incidences that lead to death. Also abbreviated as SIDS, sleep-related infant deaths have led to massive loss of baby lives. That is why the parents of Central New Jersey were excited to receive baby boxes.

 

 

Baby Box

 

 

It is approximated that the United States of America registers a higher infant rate of mortality. Reports specifically indicate that there are 6.5 instances of infant deaths in every 1000 births. This statistic ranks the United States of America the 23rd across the world. According to the same reports, 93% of infant deaths in 2016 were caused by SIDS. Towards these statistics, the baby box program was initiated to reduce the high infant mortality rates. Baby Box Company was elated to announce its partnership with Child’s Fatality as well as Fatality Review Board.

 

 

Conclusion

 

 

The partnership was geared towards the distribution of durable cardboard boxes together will essential basic items for the babies. The sizes of the boxes were large enough to serve as a bed for every infant. This box would be useful in the first few months of the baby’s life. It is projected that New Jersey will be the leading state in America to provide the universal baby box initiative for the parents. The baby boxes are fitted with mattresses for comfort. With the Centre for Disease Control being the initiator of the baby box project, it is approximated that over 105,000 families will have the boxes for the safety of newborn. The initiative of the project originated from Finland over eighty years ago. Currently, the infant’s mortality rates in Finland are the lowest across the world with 1.3 deaths being registered in 1000 births.

 

Strict Parenting Can Lead To Poor School Performance

A new study has shown that strict parenting can have a negative impact on school performance. The study was performed by a team of researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. It involved over 1,482 subjects. It can also affect a child’s interactions with peers.

 

Harsh parenting, such as yelling, hitting or threatening, hurt more than they help. The researchers found that the students whose parents were strict stated their peers were more important than their school work. They spent more time hanging out with friends than studying and doing their homework. They were also more likely to engage in delinquent behavior and early sexual behavior.

 

Rochelle Henteges was one of the authors of the study. She stated that people who are subjected to harsh parenting often do not have good relationships with their parents. That is why they make seek validation from their peers. They may also engage in unhealthy behavior. Additionally, they may break their own parent’s rules and hang out with their friends instead of going homework and studying. This can have a negative impact on one’s performance in the classroom.

 

People who perform poorly in the classroom are more likely to drop out of high school or college. This can lead to a poorer quality of life. Holger Ziegler is a professor at Bielefield University, which is located in Germany. He stated that he is not surprised by the findings. Verbal abuse and corporal punishment do not benefit a young person’s development.

 

Holger did a study in 2013 that showed that 25 percent of students in Germany were regularly hit by their parents. A team of researchers at the University of Pittsburgh stated that graduation rates could be boosted if there were programs that helped students be more engaged in the classroom.

 

Ming Te-Wang is an associate professor of education. She stated that students who have low academic achievement and are subjected to harsh corporal punishment may be targeted for an intervention.