Recap: Susan McGalla’s Advice to Working Women press release

Susan McGalla is a woman on a mission. Her mission is to inspire, motivate, and guide women to succeed in business careers. As founder of P3 Executive Consulting, LLC, McGalla has taken up the mantel of the women who have fought for the right to have a seat at the management table and better overall working conditions for women everywhere. She also assists clients with operational efficiencies, talent management, marketing, branding, and much more. Recently she shared three tactics women can use to overcome the difficulties they face in the workplace and become successful.

 

  1. Higher Education Opens Up Greater Opportunities

 

The economy needs skilled workers. For women to be successful in workplaces dominated by men, more women must earn college degrees, McGalla says. Young women shouldn’t let the growing cost of a college education stop them. She advises them to rely on scholarships, financial aid, and smart planning. McGalla pointed out that women already make up nearly half of America’s professional workers and more than half of college students. She said it is important these trends continue so women can win the ‘war for talent’ in the coming year.

 

  1. Continued Confidence

 

McGalla explained that it’s essential for women to build a support network of influencers who will motivate them to do the highest quality work possible. This will give them the opportunity to attain higher management positions. This can help women who have higher education and have taken advantage of the opportunities presented to them feel more confident once they have entered a work environment remain confident enough to succeed. This is important, McGalla explained because a study done by Bain & Company shows that the influence of management can cause women’s level of aspiration to drop by up to 60%.

 

  1. Ignore the Glass Ceiling

 

One of the strategies McGalla says led to her success is paying attention to her work ethic and ignoring the “glass ceiling”. She said she didn’t carry a chip on her shoulder or worried about prejudices that existed in the workplace or what she was entitled to because she is a woman. Nor did she worry about breaking through the glass ceiling. She advises women to not allow themselves to be subject to discrimination or prejudice, or reinforce stereotypes. Instead, she says they should persevere and let their work speak for itself in the face of workplaces where gender-designated role dominate.