Getting Married Will Reduce Your Dementia Risk

Scientists have discovered yet another reason why people should get hitched. Being in a healthy marriage will drastically lower your risk of getting dementia. This debilitating brain disease reduces the ability of people over the age of 65 to think and recall information. It’s characterized by emotional problems, inability to express oneself and decreased motivation.

The Risk Increases in Single People

There is overwhelming evidence that marriage will reduce dementia risk. A paper presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International conference shows that single people have an increased chance of getting the brain disease by 42 %. A review of 14 related studies also indicated that the risk increased by a quarter in widowed persons. Divorced people, however, weren’t more likely to get dementia than those who are single.

Why the risk decreases in married individuals

The explanation for this is pretty simple. Married people receive more social support than their single counterparts. They are also likely to take care of their health to live a longer life with their partners. If they get dementia, their mental resilience will allow them to keep functioning for a longer time without displaying symptoms.

Married people generally stay healthy for a longer time as they are more financially secure. Two people obviously bring in more income than one person. If a single person is incapacitated by illness or termination, their spouse will support them financially as they recover. A single person, on the other hand, will only rely on their savings to get through hard times. This puts a lot of pressure on them, ultimately causing health problems like dementia.

If you are in love, get married. You will gain a lot by being in a healthy union. Several studies show that you are likely to live a healthier and longer life if you are married. If this doesn’t encourage you to propose, I don’t know what will.

It’s Possible To Raise A Truly Bilingual Child

In many parts of the world, raising a child that speaks more than one language is the norm. In the United States, on the other hand, helping your child to grow up truly bilingual can be very challenging. Yet it is possible. The key is early and consistent exposure to both languages. In most cases children in the United States attend schools, watch television shows and live in communities where English is the language that is spoken primarily. But there are things parents can do to help their children become bilingual.

If the parent and some of the children’s other close relatives are not native English speakers, they should make sure to communicate with the child in their native language beginning when they are very young. They should also make sure there are lots of opportunities for the child to communicate with others that speak the language the parents want them to learn. A recent article in The New York Times talked about how foreign speaking care givers and others can help a child learn a second language(www.nytimes.com/2017/07/10/well/family/raising-a-truly-bilingual-child.html).

For the child to grow up truly bilingual, people must continue to communicate with them in the second language throughout their lives. It also helps if they use media like radio, television, books and magazines in the second language as well. In ‘Raising a Bilingual Child’ by Barbara Zurer Pearson, the author gives step-by-step instructions and a host of valuable tips parents can use to help their child grow up bilingual. She also points out many of the benefits being bilingual offers. It’s just further confirmation that it is possible to raise a healthy, happy, bilingual child.

But parents shouldn’t be under any illusions. If you want your child to grow up bilingual, it’s going to take time and consistent effort.

Parenting In Central New Jersey Should Not Include Comparison

There are a number of issues being faced by parents in Central New Jersey. One of them is the comparison among kids.
This is typically with regard to material possessions. Parents come face-to-face with this reality when they see their kids lying. This is because they wish to gel in with their peer group. Hence they may lie about having a big house, a luxury car, or even expensive dresses.

It is important to know why kids lie and how they get these ideas. Parents in Central New Jersey and anywhere else in the world are giving their children everything that they could possibly want. They do not wish to deny them simply anything. This can be due to love for them, or to rid their conscience of guilt for not spending much time with them. Besides, parents are generous because they can afford it.

But over time, this spending on kids tends to get out of control. It is important to get to the background of it. The society we live in tends to reinforce that we are worth based on what we possess and not on who we are as a person.

This is why people try to portray more than what they actually have. This can lead to lying, deceit and so on. Kids want to show that they have more than what the others around them have. This is where parenting can play a major part.

Kids tend to emulate their parents. In case the parents are grounded, so will the kids be. Parents need to instill values in their kids. They need to tell the kids that people are more valuable than the things they possess. Once kids understand this concept, they would stop comparing themselves with others on the basis of what all they possess.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/learnvest/2013/08/23/does-your-kid-have-a-bad-case-of-comparisonitis/#734f193a2fb8

Open Class Rooms and No Class Rooms For Many New Jersey Schools

New Jersey education is hopeful for reform. Currently, education pay outs are based on a set amount per district. This equation does not factor in that some districts may be experiencing a student surge while others have smaller numbers. In some over crowded areas teachers are educating in rooms of 28 or more while the recommended student to teacher ratio is at 21.

Over crowded neighborhoods with not enough resources are having to resort to buildings that were previously used as montessori schools. Teachers are teaching in open spaces that are not divided by walls which can be highly distracting to other children learning. Additionally, gyms are being used as lunch rooms and libraries are being doubled as “classrooms” for english learning students. While some may argue that using the space for multi purposes is a smart idea, others will argue that there is a definite need for classroom walls.

With elections coming in November many New Jersey families are hopeful that a new governor will mean a new education reform plan. School districts with low enrollment are receiving the same as school districts with high enrollment and there is no factor in place for special needs children. Additionally, many substance abuse counselers and nurses have been laid back to make room for budget cuts. This leaves children who are already in need without more resources that they would normally depend on. The Superintendent, Mr. Tomazec, has said that the district will be getting some renovations to libraries that will ultimately create additional and much-needed classroom space.

Recent News on Parenting Trends in Central New Jersey

New Jersey is the top State in America with the highest number of millennial aged18 to 24 still living at home with their parents. The figure stands at 47 % of all the young adults in the state as at 2015. Only a third of this group could comfortably live independently of their relatives whereas the majority would prefer to live with their parents than their spouses.

Reasons given

So many explanations have been given explaining this trend, the leading one being that young people marry late in their lives due to their pursuit of a university degree. Census data reveals that New Jersey dragged behind in wage growth, a strong indication as to the cause of the highest number of millennial preferring to stay at home. With unemployment rates according to the Bureau of Statistics in the country standing at 4.8 %, the figure in New Jersey stood at 5 %. The data suggest more youth will opt to stay at home due to harsh economic conditions. Most of the recent college graduates are strapped with debts, the average debt load as at 2014 for a single graduate standing at $28,000. The data is a generation of the Institute for College Access and Success.

Gender divides at work places

The gender imbalance at work places played a crucial role in exacerbating this situation of parenting in states like New Jersey. Pew Research Center showed that women are more likely to live with a spouse or a partner. More senior citizens were found to live alone since their relatives had passed away or had moved to nursing homes. Counties that joined the list as having the most dependent millennial included Hunterdon, Passaic and Sussex, each standing at 55 %. The situation would not be very encouraging, in the economic sense, since most of them will not have the capability of buying homes and starting new families.

Touch-A-Truck Event in New Jersey

It is no surprise that kids love trucks and an annual event in Gloucester County near Central New Jersey takes advantage of this interest to teach and educate families and children. The event is known as the Touch-A-Truck and More and will be running for the fourth consecutive year, but this time with new features to help to

Touch-A-Truck and More will take place on August 12th at the Gloucester County 4-H Fair Grounds which are located at 275 Bridgeton Pike (Route 77), Mullica Hill. It runs from ten in the morning until three in the afternoon and will occur during rain or shine. The event charges by the carload and it costs $5 per car, so be sure to pack the kids in tight.

At the event there will be games, educational tables, children’s events, and even a petting zoo. Children’s games and events include bubble balls that children can interact with, face painting options, craft tables, magicians to play with children, and various art activities to teach and entertain. Of course, there will also be a wide range of trucks and other vehicles that children can climb on and explore. Include in the mix are trucks, firetrucks, and even race cars. Monster trucks, big rigs, and tow trucks will all be part of the exhibition. Food and drinks will also be available for purchase at the site.

Home Depot will be partially sponsoring the event and will have craft tables set up to teach children and, of course, to interact with parents as well.

The proceeds from the event will go to the Heart of South Jersey an organization that provides life skills and assistance to those in need.

Touch-a-Truck has proved to be a lasting institution in Gloucester County and will provide a great, affordable, and educational opportunity for the entire community.

Woman Pens Beautiful Op Ed Piece Regarding Loss and Parenting

Maggie Kneip, a mother of two and the author of the memoir, “Now Everyone Will Know: The Perfect Husband, His Shattering Secret, My Rediscovered Life,” recently penned a moving article for the New York Times in which she relayed her message of hope in parenting following the death of husband in 1990. The Hoboken, New Jersey native bravely recounted her journey to the alter with her best friend and lover, followed by his diagnoses, loss, and her struggle to raise her children with the light of his memory.

 

Kneip was a struggling waitress when she met and fell in love with John Andrew. Andrew had a background in theatre and was working as an editor for the Wall Street Journal when the pair married. Kneip recounts in her editorial for the New York Times being unconditionally in love with the man who rescued her from the despair she felt following the end of a major relationship. The two married a little after a year of dating and had a son and daughter within two years of their new marriage. In 1990, John was diagnosed with AIDS and began to succumb to his disease very quickly. Nine short months after his diagnoses he had died, leaving his wife and two very young children to learn to live life without him.

 

Kneip relayed her fear of having contracted the disease from her husband following his diagnoses. After doctors gave her and her children a clean bill of health, Kneip spent several years attempting to ignore the fact that her husband died of AIDS by avoiding discussions of him with her children and suppressing the memories. After her children graduated from college, Kneip began to discover a great deal of peace by talking about her husband’s circumstances and sharing her love for him with her children. This ultimately turned into the publication of her memoir, a book which remained on the New York Times best seller list for an entire year and helped her children heal. Good things can come from tragedy.

 

What New Jersey Parents Can Do This Summer to Keep Their Kids Active

For any parent living in New Jersey, you know how frustrating it can be to keep your kids busy when they’re not in school. One of the most unfortunate aspects of summer break is that most kids lose a lot of what they learned during the past school year. This is incredibly problematic for parents who want to see their kids succeed, so it’s crucial that you keep them active and engaged even when they’re not going to class every day. In New Jersey, there are quite a lot of things you and your children can do in the hot summer sun.

 

For one, getting your child involved in a summer camp program is ideal because it helps to keep them active and their brained engaged. There are tons of summer camp programs available in central Jersey, so it should be pretty effortless to find the one that’s right for you and your child. You have two options available to you when it comes to summer camp. Day camps are great for children who still want to come home each and every day. Day camps are similar to a schooling program, since they’ll only be gone for a few hours each day before returning home. You can also choose a regular summer camp program that has your children go to the camp and stay there exclusively for several weeks before getting out.

 

The price you pay for summer camp is totally dependent on what you’re looking for in terms of your child’s education and what you can afford. Certain summer camps are free or low cost for families who are considered low income. It is a good idea for all parents to keep their children as active as possible despite the fact that they are no longer in school. If summer camps aren’t your forte, you might want to consider starting an educational program in the comfort of your own home or spending more time outdoors.

 

Parenting After Divorce: The Bird Nesting Method

In a recently published New York Times article, writer Beth Behrendt discussed the benefits of a relatively new parenting option for divorced families called the bird nesting method. Behrendt and her ex husband have successfully used the nesting method for the past three years to coparent their three children. In the nesting method, the divorced parents each purchase or rent a separate living space from the family’s previously established home. They then choose alternate days or weeks to come and live in the family home with the children while the alternate spouse returns to the separately assigned living space. In this arrangement, children are thought to feel less jostled and displaced by a divorce because they remain in their home with their own belongings.

Behrendt described the living situation as one that appealed to both she and her ex-husband because they desired to place the needs of their boys before their own needs. During a recent speaking event in New Jersey where Behrendt gave a talk about the nesting method, she described her reaction when she first read about the arrangement in a book about simplified divorces. Behrendt stated that she breathed a sigh of relief at the idea that her boys could maintain as much of their original lives as possible throughout the divorce.

Behrends stated that she is frequently asked about her peculiar nesting arrangement by other well meaning parents in PTA groups or school conferences. She advised for parents considering the method to answer a few questions regarding the method. The parents should ask if they can work together to maintain their previously established home, if they can both reasonably find a home to live in during the times when they are not occupying the home, and if they can come to an agreement about the circumstance. If the answer to any of these questions is no, the nesting method may not be suitable. Those open to the nesting method, however, may find it a reasonable solution to their divorce.

New York Times Investigates Results of Saying “No” to Children

In a recent opinion editorial published by the New York Times, a New Jersey author, Scott Sonenshein, discussed some positive effectives of saying, “no,” to a child. Despite the frequent attempts to vilify negative affirmations from parents to children, several new studies show what common sense already tells most parents. To build character in children, they must be refused on a regular and consistent basis.

Soneshein points out in his article that most parents, throughout the history of the world, have understood children as a group of individuals who are growing and learning. Because of the immature nature of a child, it is important to correct behavior on a consistent basis if the child is to develop into a responsible, productive member of society. Saying no to a child does not have to be a negative experience. By teaching children that all humans are eventually given negative answers in life, parents enforce the idea that challenges can be overcome and that negative answers can actually be positive and beneficial. If a toddler asks for cake for every meal of the day, for instance, the parents answer should explain why this is a poor choice that will ultimately lead to illness in the child. In this case, a negative answer is the loving answer and a positive one would be considered neglectful.

Soneshein also sites a study where children are asked to construct a new object from the ones they are given. In this study, younger children were shown to be more resilient than older ones and more adaptable to negative answers. Soneshein relayed the message that parents should not always be in the habit of purchasing every item children ask for. Not only does this create spoiled and entitled children, but it limits a child’s ability to become resourceful when they lack something they believe they need. We have all heard the stories about how our grandparents didn’t have fancy toys so they got creative with dirt and a box. Much like this example, children learn extremely resourcefulness when they are given negative answers.