Baby Box Distribution After Web Education In New Jersey

In January of 2017 New Jersey decided to begin offering parents a baby box. The baby box is extremely popular in Finland. This Nordic country has some of the lowest infant mortality rates in the world. Finland has been giving its expecting mothers baby boxes since the 1930’s. The baby box comes equipped with basics that all newborns will need such as diapers, breast pads for the mom, wipes, clothing and even a tiny mattress. Once emptied, the baby box can be used as the babies’ first bed.

Parents who wish to receive one of these baby boxes need to sign up online and watch a video that is about ten to fifteen minutes long and pass a short quiz after. The video details such subjects as breastfeeding, safe sleeping techniques and local family resources. Sign up is free and at a site called Baby Box University. New Jersey’s Child Fatality and Near Fatality Review Board and the Baby Box review board partnered up to offer these boxes to New Jersey residents.

Currently New Jersey is the first state within the United States to begin offering the baby box. New Jersey is expecting to distribute over one hundred thousand baby boxes in 2017 alone. The Center for Disease Control is supplementing New Jersey’s Child Fatality and Near Fatality Review Board with a supplemental grand to cover the cost of the Baby Boxes. The Baby Box company is hopeful to establish themselves within more states in the United States. The key to SIDS prevention can be education and the appropriate sleeping conditions, Baby Box is providing both with their box and online videos.

New Jersey Writer Discusses Changes in Parenting Styles

John Rosemond, a popular columnist for the New Jersey Advocate, recently published a parenting piece about the way that parenting styles have changed from marriage-oriented styles to child-oriented styles since the late 1960s. Rosemond has received a great deal of positive and negative feedback since the publication of this article and decided to publish a continuation of the article to address questions that he frequently received regarding the development of marriage or parent centered parenting styles. In his most recent article on the subject, Rosemond assert that the development of parenting styles which center around children, their feelings, and their personal outlooks on discipline and behavior problems have ultimately led to an onslaught of emotional and moral decay that millennials have experienced since the popularization of this parenting styles. In order to redeem the culture, a shift in the collective parental mindset is required.

 

Rosemond begins his article by discussing the movement from traditional marriage-based child rearing to psychology-based theory which focused more on the appeasement of childhood desires and turned normative discipline involved in child rearing into a negative aspect. Rosemond completely refuted this method of child rearing, stating that children are better adapted to adult hood, find more security and stability in day to day life, and are generally more emotionally stable when they are raised by parents who focus more attention on their spouse’s desires than the desires of their children.

 

Although Rosemond has his critics, study after study supports the journalist in his findings. Studies show that children who grow up in households where they are certain of their parents commitment to marriage feel more secure and emotionally stable than children who grow up in households where their parents are committed to the children but lack significant commitment to their spouses. Children who are raised in households where psychologically themed child rearing is performed often report feeling inadequate and suffering from emotional challenges in early adulthood. These children also struggle with serious relationships because they were raised with an adult who centered the child’s first primary relationship on the child. Because of this, the children often assume that romantic relationships should also center around them.