The Baby Box for New Parents

The baby box is something that has that has gained a lot of attention. There are a ton of people that are interested in new baby boxes because it gives people access to some physical products for the baby. It also gives people access to education about how to care for a child.

So many people that have access to the universal baby box will have a pathway to a better safety program for their children. There are things like Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Syndrome. There are new mothers that may not know anything about parenting, but the new box will help a lot of people. There are many people that will be able to get the baby box for their babies to sleep in. New parents are going to appreciate the box because it provides some products that can help people make better decisions when it comes to purchase things for their newborns.

Baby wipes and diapers are just a part of the products that are in the box. There are also clothes and breast pads for mothers. Many parents in New Jersey will appreciate this because it was the first state to put this into place. The baby box is quite a nice gift for new parents. The cost of this box is about $150. That is a considerable amount of savings for new parents.

Tons of people are going to appreciate what the Baby Box does for parents that are struggling. New parents have wondered how they can actually find ways to educate themselves on parenting concepts. Parenting is certainly a very challenging job, and all mothers can use some help in the beginning. This is a very comforting thing for all the people that may be struggling with the ideal of parenting for the first time.

Getting Married Will Reduce Your Dementia Risk

Scientists have discovered yet another reason why people should get hitched. Being in a healthy marriage will drastically lower your risk of getting dementia. This debilitating brain disease reduces the ability of people over the age of 65 to think and recall information. It’s characterized by emotional problems, inability to express oneself and decreased motivation.

The Risk Increases in Single People

There is overwhelming evidence that marriage will reduce dementia risk. A paper presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International conference shows that single people have an increased chance of getting the brain disease by 42 %. A review of 14 related studies also indicated that the risk increased by a quarter in widowed persons. Divorced people, however, weren’t more likely to get dementia than those who are single.

Why the risk decreases in married individuals

The explanation for this is pretty simple. Married people receive more social support than their single counterparts. They are also likely to take care of their health to live a longer life with their partners. If they get dementia, their mental resilience will allow them to keep functioning for a longer time without displaying symptoms.

Married people generally stay healthy for a longer time as they are more financially secure. Two people obviously bring in more income than one person. If a single person is incapacitated by illness or termination, their spouse will support them financially as they recover. A single person, on the other hand, will only rely on their savings to get through hard times. This puts a lot of pressure on them, ultimately causing health problems like dementia.

If you are in love, get married. You will gain a lot by being in a healthy union. Several studies show that you are likely to live a healthier and longer life if you are married. If this doesn’t encourage you to propose, I don’t know what will.

Extended Use of Cell Phones hurting Parenting

Parents are spending more time that necessary connected to their electronic devices, a recent study has shown. According to the study, parents are spending more than nine hours a day with various screen media devices and out of this, seven hours and forty-three minutes are spent on screen media. Only an hour and some thirty-nine minutes are used for work,
The study conducted by Common Sense Media surveyed 1,786 parents country wide. Watching the TV, reading both print and electronic books, using digital devices in different things, using social media, playing games and generally browsing through websites are the activities that Common Sense Media put in covered in the study.
The study further observed that 54% of parents said screen time does not impact on the behavior of their children.
It further showed that those parents decrease the harmful impact that screen time has on them when their children use these devices. The research highlights face-face communication, emotional connection and well-being, physical activity, school performance, relationships and the ability to focus as areas most impacted by lengthy screen connections.
The report comes amid continued emphasis by medical and mental health professionals persistently calling on parents and the general public to be wary of the effects of extended connections on devices.
As more options to remain connected become available, parents are advised to find fun and meaningful time away from their beloved devices, in order to enhance relationships with their children. Kids said that when their parents become distracted by lengthy use of cell phones, they lack their attention, an observation that many fathers and mothers agreed on
A survey by AVG Technologies conducted in June 2016 concurred with the Common Sense Survey, noting that 32 percent of children felt unimportant when parents got distracted by devices. The AVT Technologies survey was conducted on more than 4,000 children aged between eight to thirteen years in Australia, Canada, Brazil, The United Kingdom, Germany, the Czech Republic and the United States

Woman Pens Beautiful Op Ed Piece Regarding Loss and Parenting

Maggie Kneip, a mother of two and the author of the memoir, “Now Everyone Will Know: The Perfect Husband, His Shattering Secret, My Rediscovered Life,” recently penned a moving article for the New York Times in which she relayed her message of hope in parenting following the death of husband in 1990. The Hoboken, New Jersey native bravely recounted her journey to the alter with her best friend and lover, followed by his diagnoses, loss, and her struggle to raise her children with the light of his memory.

 

Kneip was a struggling waitress when she met and fell in love with John Andrew. Andrew had a background in theatre and was working as an editor for the Wall Street Journal when the pair married. Kneip recounts in her editorial for the New York Times being unconditionally in love with the man who rescued her from the despair she felt following the end of a major relationship. The two married a little after a year of dating and had a son and daughter within two years of their new marriage. In 1990, John was diagnosed with AIDS and began to succumb to his disease very quickly. Nine short months after his diagnoses he had died, leaving his wife and two very young children to learn to live life without him.

 

Kneip relayed her fear of having contracted the disease from her husband following his diagnoses. After doctors gave her and her children a clean bill of health, Kneip spent several years attempting to ignore the fact that her husband died of AIDS by avoiding discussions of him with her children and suppressing the memories. After her children graduated from college, Kneip began to discover a great deal of peace by talking about her husband’s circumstances and sharing her love for him with her children. This ultimately turned into the publication of her memoir, a book which remained on the New York Times best seller list for an entire year and helped her children heal. Good things can come from tragedy.

 

Ben Sasse Speaks to New Jersey Audience on Parenting and American Values

Senator Ben Sasse recently gave an address to the New Jersey parenting coalition during which he discussed parenting methods and American values from his most recent book, “The Vanishing American Adult.” During the address, Sasse listed several of the key issues that he believes is negatively contributing to the decline in the values and responsibility of the millennial generation. The senator from Nebraska stated that the current generation of young adults suffered greatly from a lack of structure, exposure to consistent and rigorous work, and requirement to grow up.

 

The senator’s book was recently reviewed by the New York Times. The news outlet’s review of the book was not overwhelmingly positive, but the GOP senator doubtlessly expected nothing less from a liberal news source. Despite less than sparkling press from sources like the Times, Sasse’s published work struck a cord with a large percentage of the American people. For quite some time, Americans have noticed a shift in the priorities and willingness to engage in honest work among the younger generation. This phenomena, according to Ben Sasse, is likely a direct result of inadequate parenting.

 

In his book, Sasse recalls the required labor of his youth. As a boy, Ben Sasse was required to work on a farm and was responsible for certain tasks that were carried out on the farm every day. This required Sasse and his siblings to wake up at dawn every morning, preparing for a full day of hard work. Sasse recounts his experiences picking crops, hauling in heavy tools, and cleaning the barn behind farm animals. Anyone who has ever worked on a farm, even for a single day, can understand the senator’s sentiments regarding hard labor. Although Sasse admits he did not enjoy the labor he was forced to participate in as a youth, he would not trade his experience. For him, his parents’ and grandparents’ commitment to his personal development helped him to become the respectable, hardworking man he is today.

What New Jersey Parents Can Do This Summer to Keep Their Kids Active

For any parent living in New Jersey, you know how frustrating it can be to keep your kids busy when they’re not in school. One of the most unfortunate aspects of summer break is that most kids lose a lot of what they learned during the past school year. This is incredibly problematic for parents who want to see their kids succeed, so it’s crucial that you keep them active and engaged even when they’re not going to class every day. In New Jersey, there are quite a lot of things you and your children can do in the hot summer sun.

 

For one, getting your child involved in a summer camp program is ideal because it helps to keep them active and their brained engaged. There are tons of summer camp programs available in central Jersey, so it should be pretty effortless to find the one that’s right for you and your child. You have two options available to you when it comes to summer camp. Day camps are great for children who still want to come home each and every day. Day camps are similar to a schooling program, since they’ll only be gone for a few hours each day before returning home. You can also choose a regular summer camp program that has your children go to the camp and stay there exclusively for several weeks before getting out.

 

The price you pay for summer camp is totally dependent on what you’re looking for in terms of your child’s education and what you can afford. Certain summer camps are free or low cost for families who are considered low income. It is a good idea for all parents to keep their children as active as possible despite the fact that they are no longer in school. If summer camps aren’t your forte, you might want to consider starting an educational program in the comfort of your own home or spending more time outdoors.

 

Are Children Often Forced to Give Up Childhood in Service to Sports?

The New York Times recently investigated whether or not children often were forced to participate in sports for a large portion of their developing years. In an opinion editorial, David McGlynn, the author of a fatherhood memoir, recounted his feelings about his son’s experience with sports and how one decision made all the difference in his son’s life.

 

McGlynn recounts his own childhood as a part of the sports community. The current professor at a Wisconsin university spent most of his developmental years preparing to be a competitive swimmer. He swam for his high school team as well as a more competitive team during his high school years. He earned a scholarship to college where he remembers being beaten on a regular basis by swimmers who would go on to win Olympic medals. McGlynn recalls his frequent practices, long hours spent traveling for competitions, and sore muscles from all the physical work he put in. He also recalls greatly enjoying every minute of his time spent swimming competitively. Because he enjoyed his experience so much, it was difficult for him to admit to himself that his son, a budding basketball player, seemed to be miserable.

 

After having several discussions with parents who had raised children who participated in competitive sports, McGlynn gave his son the option of quitting the basketball team. He suggested that they spend their weekends and free time participating in activities that they actually enjoyed like kayaking or skiing. After some consideration, McGlynn’s son did quit basketball in favor of more enjoyable activities and his dad noticed that the decision was the right one. No longer was McGlynn’s son angrily contemplating mistakes he made in games or practices, but he was now enjoying life and building character in non-competitive activities. McGlynn went on to publish a memoir encouraging Americans to investigate the true nature of their children’s involvement with sports and if that involvement is adding value or hindrance to the family’s life.

 

Parenting After Divorce: The Bird Nesting Method

In a recently published New York Times article, writer Beth Behrendt discussed the benefits of a relatively new parenting option for divorced families called the bird nesting method. Behrendt and her ex husband have successfully used the nesting method for the past three years to coparent their three children. In the nesting method, the divorced parents each purchase or rent a separate living space from the family’s previously established home. They then choose alternate days or weeks to come and live in the family home with the children while the alternate spouse returns to the separately assigned living space. In this arrangement, children are thought to feel less jostled and displaced by a divorce because they remain in their home with their own belongings.

Behrendt described the living situation as one that appealed to both she and her ex-husband because they desired to place the needs of their boys before their own needs. During a recent speaking event in New Jersey where Behrendt gave a talk about the nesting method, she described her reaction when she first read about the arrangement in a book about simplified divorces. Behrendt stated that she breathed a sigh of relief at the idea that her boys could maintain as much of their original lives as possible throughout the divorce.

Behrends stated that she is frequently asked about her peculiar nesting arrangement by other well meaning parents in PTA groups or school conferences. She advised for parents considering the method to answer a few questions regarding the method. The parents should ask if they can work together to maintain their previously established home, if they can both reasonably find a home to live in during the times when they are not occupying the home, and if they can come to an agreement about the circumstance. If the answer to any of these questions is no, the nesting method may not be suitable. Those open to the nesting method, however, may find it a reasonable solution to their divorce.

New York Times Investigates Results of Saying “No” to Children

In a recent opinion editorial published by the New York Times, a New Jersey author, Scott Sonenshein, discussed some positive effectives of saying, “no,” to a child. Despite the frequent attempts to vilify negative affirmations from parents to children, several new studies show what common sense already tells most parents. To build character in children, they must be refused on a regular and consistent basis.

Soneshein points out in his article that most parents, throughout the history of the world, have understood children as a group of individuals who are growing and learning. Because of the immature nature of a child, it is important to correct behavior on a consistent basis if the child is to develop into a responsible, productive member of society. Saying no to a child does not have to be a negative experience. By teaching children that all humans are eventually given negative answers in life, parents enforce the idea that challenges can be overcome and that negative answers can actually be positive and beneficial. If a toddler asks for cake for every meal of the day, for instance, the parents answer should explain why this is a poor choice that will ultimately lead to illness in the child. In this case, a negative answer is the loving answer and a positive one would be considered neglectful.

Soneshein also sites a study where children are asked to construct a new object from the ones they are given. In this study, younger children were shown to be more resilient than older ones and more adaptable to negative answers. Soneshein relayed the message that parents should not always be in the habit of purchasing every item children ask for. Not only does this create spoiled and entitled children, but it limits a child’s ability to become resourceful when they lack something they believe they need. We have all heard the stories about how our grandparents didn’t have fancy toys so they got creative with dirt and a box. Much like this example, children learn extremely resourcefulness when they are given negative answers.

Mindfulness in Parents May Cause a More Peaceful Birth Experience, According to New Jersey Physician

New research from New Jersey’s Center for Pregnancy Research has recently revealed that mindfulness among parents may lead to a peaceful and less painful birthing experience. The study was recently mentioned in an article from the New York Times and consisted of a trial of 30 pregnant mothers were monitored before, during, and after their deliveries in an effort to control the anxiety that they felt. The results of the study make researchers hopeful that non-chemical methods of pain relief during childbirth can be on the horizon for expectant moms.

At the beginning of the trial, new parents were asked about their fears regarding childbirth. Most of the new mothers, not surprisingly, stated that they feared the pain of childbirth in a very real way, having not ever experienced it before. Researchers then attempted to educate the expectant mothers in mindfulness to prepare them for childbirth. In the mindfulness education classes, certified midwives would attempt to teach mothers to remain alert and focused on the present moment during labor. Midwives stated, during the course, that the key to mindfulness was that new mothers must learn not to focus on events before or after the most current contraction. They were taught that they could overcome their fears about the labor by implementing a moment by moment thought process.

Following their education in the ways of labor and delivery mindfulness, the confidence levels of the new parents were measured according to a survey. By the end of the research experience, mothers were much more confident in their ability to have a peaceful and controlled labor and delivery. According to one midwife, mindfulness creates opportunities for the expectant mothers to discover new levels of inner strength and resources. The mindfulness studies were shown to significantly impact the pain of childbirth for the mothers who attended the classes. More than half of the mothers believe they had a controlled and peaceful birth because of the preparation they received prior to delivery.